Let's Talk Interfacings, Foam, Fusibles

Resources

If there is one topic everyone touches on eventually, it's interfacings, stabilizers, foam, and fusibles. Since it's my mission to bring you expertise from all over, I will continue to build on this information, but we have to start somewhere, so let's get started!

The two brands we typically use are Bosal and Pellon. Both are great options and it all depends on what we're doing and which is available on our schedule actually.

I've gathered resources from a number of online sources with good information for you to have in one place. You will also find printables for your reference if you'd like.

How to Apply Interfacings by SewingSupport.com

When applying fusible interfacing, it’s best to follow the manufacturer’s instructions. But sometimes the instructions are missing. Perhaps they got lost, accidentally thrown out, or maybe you never received them in the first place. So here are some general guidelines that should work for most fusible interfacings:

First, test your interfacing

Apply the interfacing to a scrap of your fabric following the "How to apply fusible interfacing" instructions below. After your fabric piece has cooled, check the bond by trying to peel the layers apart. If the bond doesn’t feel secure, try another application using more heat, time, or pressure. Also, make sure the adhesive hasn’t seeped through to the right of your fabric. And make sure the interfacing has produced the degree of stiffness you want. After testing, cut your interfacing pieces out. Your pattern should indicate which pieces to cut interfacing from. Then trim the seam allowances to about an eighth of an inch to reduce bulk.

How to apply fusible interfacing

Tools needed:

  • Iron
  • Ironing board
  • Press cloth
  • Spray bottle

In order to form a proper bond with your fabric, fusible interfacing needs four things: heat, steam, pressure, and time. For lightweight fabric and interfacing, set your iron temperature a little higher than what’s appropriate for the fabric – your press cloth will protect it from the extra heat. For medium to heavyweight fabric and interfacing, set your iron to “wool.” Let your iron heat up for about 15 minutes to make sure it’s nice and hot.

Place your fabric piece on your ironing board wrong side up. Center your interfacing on top of it, adhesive side down (the adhesive side has the raised bumps on it). If you didn’t preshrink your interfacing prior to cutting it out, steam shrink it now by placing your iron over the interfacing piece (but not touching it) and steaming it for a few seconds. Steam-baste the interfacing in place by touching it in several places with the tip of your iron. This will bond the interfacing lightly to your fabric so it won’t shift during the fusing process. Dampen your press cloth using your spray bottle making it evenly damp, but not soaking wet. Place your press cloth on top of the interfacing.

Place your iron straight down onto one section of your fabric piece and apply firm, even pressure. You may want to use both hands. Do not slide your iron.

For lightweight fabric and interfacing, press and hold for about 10 seconds. For medium to heavyweight fabric and interfacing, press and hold for 10 to 15 seconds.

After the appropriate time has elapsed, lift your iron. Your press cloth should be dry. If it’s not, raise your iron temperature or leave the iron on your fabric piece a few seconds longer. Then place your iron straight down onto the next section to be fused, overlapping some onto the first section. Press and hold for the appropriate time.

Lift your iron and repeat this process until your entire fabric piece has been pressed. Then turn the piece over and iron it on the right side.

Leave your fabric piece in place until it has cooled completely. Moving the piece while it’s still warm can interfere with the bonding process.

More Tips

If you don’t have enough interfacing for a large piece, you can make a whole piece by joining several smaller pieces of interfacing together. You can slightly overlap the edges of lighter pieces of interfacing, but with heavier interfacing, butt the pieces together.

If you’re finding it difficult to press down on your fabric piece, try lowering your ironing board. Your body weight will help you exert more pressure with your iron.

Fusible interfacing isn’t appropriate for all fabrics. Non-fusible interfacing is a better choice for highly textured fabrics, napped fabrics, fabrics that can’t take the heat of an iron, and open weave fabrics.

Pellon Product Guide

Here is a quick guide to Pellon products courtesy of JoAnn's. You'll find it as a download as well.

 

Bosal Foam, Fiber, Interfacings

If you haven't used Bosal products, you're in for a treat.

The most popular product we include in your sewing project boxes and kits is the In-R-Foam. Here are the directions (also as a download):

In-R-Form:   Instructions for Optimum Use for ALL In-R-Form foam products

As always when fusing to any fabric, the most important thing to remember is the fabric.

In-R-Form can withstand the cotton setting on most irons.  Remember, if the fabric is fragile you must use the fabric as your guide, using the appropriate setting on the iron.  For fusible product, always place In-R-Form under the fabric being fused; never place a hot iron directly onto the fusible side of In-R-Form.  In the case of double sided In-R-Form, fabric must be placed on both sides of the fusible foam.

In-R-Form:   Instructions for Optimum Use for ALL In-R-Form foam products

As always when fusing to any fabric, the most important thing to remember is the fabric.

In-R-Form can withstand the cotton setting on most irons.  Remember, if the fabric is fragile you must use the fabric as your guide, using the appropriate setting on the iron.  (from Debbi: this is true for all fusibles!) For fusible product, always place In-R-Form under the fabric being fused; never place a hot iron directly onto the fusible side of In-R-Form.  In the case of double sided In-R-Form, fabric must be placed on both sides of the fusible foam.

Here is their intro from the website https://bosalonline.com/:

"The highest quality interfacing, foam and fiber is all Bosal offers its customers.  Located in Limerick, Maine, Bosal has been distributing American Made products for over 60 years.

 

"A family owned business, Bosal strives to meet the needs of the consumer and stay up to date with the newest designs and exciting projects".

 

With over 200 patterns available, you will definitely find something that appeals to your craft talents.  

 

Foam, Fiber, Interfacing and Crafts, 

All first rate products to ensure 

your project lasts a lifetime.

 

Our interfacing can be used with crafts, fabric, home items, sewing projects and anything else you an dream of! 

 

Foam projects will last a lifetime with our superior quality product.

 

Batting in three thicknesses and various sizes, there is something there for everyone!"

 

Be sure to bookmark this post because I will continue to update with good resources from our favorite experts!

 


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